2017 Blog Flashback

2017 was a roller coast of a year for me. My first book came out! I read part of it in front of people for the first time! I wrote most of another book and had to scrap half it and start over! (For some reason the exclamation point in that last one makes me feel better about it). I’m grateful that it was such a productive writing year though, and sometimes I can still hardly believe that there are real print copies of a story I wrote and that people actually have them in their houses. Thanks so much to everyone who has read The Wardrobe Mistress, and to everyone who stops by my blog.

Last year, I put together a 2016 blog recap, and it was kind of fun revisiting some of the random or fun posts I’d almost forgotten about, so it’s officially a tradition now. Here are my favourite posts of the year, by month.

Photo on Visualhunt.com

January

I put together a quiz so you can test your knowledge of troublesome turns of phrase.

I creeped myself out a little bit with this Flash Fiction

I’m still baffled that this bad decision in history was a real event

February

I discovered the delight of madeleines and managed to connect my adoration to literature

I wrote about belladonna and I feel like I should point that out because there’s a lot of poison in the book I’m writing now.

March

I rounded up a list of all the people in history who died from laughing too hard.

I made a compilation of entertaining quotes by Winston Churchill because I guess I’m not even pretending to be cool anymore.

April

I interviewed Crystal King about her delectably dark novel, Feast of Sorrow.

Apparently having caught the interview bug, I pretended to interview Ophelia.  (Yep, fully accepting of my nerdism by now).
PS, I still hate Hamlet

May

Since I spend so much (too much) time sitting at a desk, I shared some helpful stretches.

Jenni Walsh swept me away to a jazzy speakeasy with Bonnie and Clyde in Becoming Bonnie.

June

I went to the Historical Novel Society conference and it was the best time ever.

I wrote a Flash Fiction about a fractured family and now I’ve just realized that ‘Fractured’ would have been a better title than ‘Goodbye’.

Nina Laurin stopped by to talk about her compelling and suspenseful novel Girl Last Seen.

July

I wrote my favourite flash fiction piece so far.

I found out that most queens had pet dogs but one had a pet gazelle.

Photo on VisualHunt.com

I was whisked away to a beautifully dangerous fantasy world in Callie Bates’ The Waking Land.

I wrote a short story about the ‘diamond necklace affair’ that scarred Marie Antoinette’s reputation even though she was innocent (and you can still get a free copy!)

August

August was a busy month for blog posts because I was celebrating the publication of my debut novel, The Wardrobe Mistress. 

I’ve basically got everything you ever wanted to know about Marie Antoinette (just kidding, her life was super complicated) but there’s plenty of details like: surprising facts, her musical nights with the Chevalier St. Georges, a black composer who led a fascinating life and should be more well remembered than he is, how she liked to give her friends personalized perfume, how she did not say ‘let them eat cake’,  a couple of her feuds, and why her dresses were considered scandalous and not for the cost.

Just so you’re educated in preparation for the extremely slim chance that you get whisked back in time to revolutionary France, I covered what you should wear. Full disclosure, given the choice, I would not time travel to revolutionary France.

I once again proved how obscure my sense of humour is with some affectionately mocking fake quotes from the French Revolution.

And finally, I stopped writing about France to gush over Elise Hooper’s novel The Other Alcott.

September

I became obsessed with the idea of moonlight gardens and I’m determined to turn my back yard into one.

I interviewed Devin Murphy about his complex historical novel The Boat Runner.

I wrote about a mayor with an extremely villainesque name whose bad decision burned up a bunch of buildings and caused an unknown number of fatalities.

October

I don’t want to sit next to any of these literary characters at dinner and you probably don’t either.

I love the escapism aspect of reading and found examples that physical descriptions in fiction can help transport the reader.

I shared my treasured apple cake recipe with you all as a token of my esteem.

November

I was lucky enough to have a group of other authors contribute to my three part ‘Lessons from Debut Authors’ series, with tips on submissions, publishing surprises, and advice for book signings, as well as fun stories of publication day celebrations.

Renee Dahlia stopped by to talk about her Bluestocking series, and shared some intriguing snippets.

December

I shared some anecdotes that should make us all grateful for modern surgical procedures.


2017 was a busy blog year, but I have to admit that my favourite blog post is still this one about foxes from last year.

So what’s going on in 2018? I’m having a lot of fun with my Flash Fiction series, so that will continue. Book Addiction will as well, and I already know a few of the amazing books I want to feature and I hope I can point some of you to a new favourite. I think Bad Decisions in History will transition to an occasional post instead of a monthly feature. I’ve been posting that one pretty regularly for two years now, and honestly it’s getting hard to come up with new topics. I might do a few more posts with advice for writers trying to get published, because there’s been some interest in the Lessons from Debut Authors series. (If this would interest you, or if you would like particular topics, let me know in the comments or by email or Twitter).

I hope you have enjoyed all 56 (!) posts of 2017. Lastly, I’m going to take this opportunity to make a small plea of my own – if you’ve read The Wardrobe Mistress, please consider leaving a review on Amazon or Goodreads. Even if you didn’t enjoy it – I promise I won’t even read it, but reviews are so important to authors – and readers – to help new books get discovered. (An excellent thing to keep in mind for other books too!) Thank you so much to everyone who has supported my book with reviews, social media sharing, buying a copy, or just expressing interest in the fact that I even wrote one. You’ve brought the book alive and I’m so grateful.

Cheers to 2018! Stay tuned for the blog to be back on January 3rd with a special book giveaway.

Book Addiction: The Bluestocking Series

It’s been a couple of months since I had a Book Addiction post, so to make up for it, this time it features two books! Renee Dahlia’s Bluestocking series is set in the late 1800s and features clever and determined heroines, both of whom have an interest in medicine. Josephine of the first book, To Charm A Bluestocking, is bookish and determined to become one of the world’s first female doctors. She goes to Holland to chase her dream – but unexpected romance and a villainous professor threaten to derail her plans. In Pursuit of a Bluestocking, the second of the series, Marie’s life plan is fitting together nicely. She’s about to become one of the first ladies to graduate medical school, with a wedding on the horizon. But the murder of her fiancé sends her on a dangerous quest to find the murderer, and save the innocent man who’s been accused.

I love an unconventional and determined heroine, and this time we have two! Renee kindly agreed to an interview about her series and included a few enticing snippets from her books, as well.

What was your inspiration for To Charm A Bluestocking and In Pursuit of a Bluestocking?

My great-grandmother was one of the first women to graduate from medical school in Holland. I thought about the challenges she would have faced, and which of those challenges are still faced by women today. Josephine in Charm is tall and shy, and is being harassed by her professor. Her friends invent a fiancé to keep the professor at bay. Marie in Pursuit thought she was happily engaged, but her fiancé turns out to be a conman. Together with Lord Stanmore, she has to hunt down the thieves.

The third book in the series, The Essence of a Bluestocking, is the story of Claire, the third of this trio of friends, and should be out early 2018.

Did you face any unexpected challenges or pleasant surprises while working on the novel?

Time is my greatest challenge. Like many writers, I balance family commitments, with a day job, and writing. I’m fortunate that a portion of my day job is seasonal, with not much work on over winter, so that provides a day or two a week for writing in the off season. In summer, I write while watching my kids play cricket.

What was your favourite scene to write?

Isn’t that like asking a parent to pick their favourite child? Some scenes wrote themselves, just flowing out, others took more work to craft the emotional context. Probably those scenes end up being favourites because of the work that they are built upon. In every book, I love writing the meet-cute scene, where the characters first crash (sometimes literally) into each other.

Josephine wrapped her cloak around her shoulders to brace against the frigid wind that cut right through her clothes. She strode along with a textbook open, one hand holding her cloak, the other on her book. Her gloved fingers were spread to hold the pages open against that cold wind. Consumed by her book, Josephine digested the information written on the pages. She shivered and wished she’d also worn a scarf to counter this dreadful weather. She closed the book, sliding it under her arm. With her head still down, she adjusted her heavy bag on her shoulder and picked up her pace.

‘Oomph.’ She crashed, hard, into a solid object. Her breath burst out of her and she flailed backwards with the force of the impact. Her arms flew up and grabbed onto something, anything, for balance, only to realise that she had smacked right into a man. A man who hadn’t budged with her impact.

 

What’s your writing process like? Do you have a strict schedule or can you write anywhere, anytime?

Necessity has taught me to be able to write anywhere under any conditions. I tend to do well with deadlines, so sprints with other writers works well, as does a snatched half hour here or there. If I have all day to write, I tend to meander and get distracted.

Your protagonist, Lady Josephine, is determined to become one of the world’s first female doctors. Did you come across any surprising research about medical practices of the time?

I had to research how to treat burns victims, and discovered an early scientific paper on the use of carbolic acid to prevent infection. Here is an extract where I used this research:

‘Do you have the paper with the new recipe?’ asked Claire.

‘Yes. I brought Father’s carriage so I’ve read the whole paper. The results they have been getting are really encouraging with regards to infection, or lack thereof. The recipe is equal parts linseed oil and lime-water with five per cent carbolic acid and a small amount of cocaine as pain relief. I made some up in the kitchen at home and have soaked it in absorbent cotton. If we remove your bandage and lay it over the wound, the paper suggests that we cover it with impermeable rubber. I couldn’t find any at home, but perhaps you have something,’ said Marie, digging in her bag to get out the poultice.

 

If you could pair your book with any drink or snack, what would you suggest?

Potatoes. They were a staple food in Holland at the time of To Charm a Bluestocking, and feature strongly in the formal dinner that occurs in that book. For In Pursuit of a Bluestocking, I researched a luxury train menu from the 1880s and even cooked some of the dishes on that menu before putting them into that book.

The next course arrived. A welcome interruption. Pork rillettes with candied fennel, potato mash and a verjuice dressing. The Dutch obsession with potatoes highlighted by the richness of the pork.

 

How can we stay updated on your book news?

Website | Facebook | Twitter
I have a newsletter that I hardly ever send out, but I will send out a Christmas letter during December that will hopefully include some big news about my new series.


From the book jacket, To Charm A Bluestocking: 

She wants to be one of the world’s first female doctors; romance is not in her plans.

1887: Too tall, too shy and too bookish for England, Lady Josephine moves to Holland to become one of the world’s first female doctors. With only one semester left, she has all but completed her studies when a power-hungry professor, intent on marrying her for her political connections, threatens to prevent her graduation. Together with the other Bluestockings, female comrades-in-study, she comes up with a daring, if somewhat unorthodox plan: acquire a fake fiancé to provide the protection and serenity she needs to pass her final exams.

But when her father sends her Lord Nicholas St. George, he is too much of everything: too handsome, too charming, too tall and too broad and too distracting for Josephine’s peace of mind. She needed someone to keep her professor at bay, not keep her from her work with temptations of long walks, laughing, and languorous kisses.

Just as it seems that Josephine might be able to have it all: a career as a pioneering female doctor and a true love match, everything falls apart and Josephine will find herself in danger of becoming a casualty in the battle between ambition and love.


From the book jacket, In Pursuit of a Bluestocking: 

When he goes hunting a thief, he never expects to catch a bluestocking…

Marie had the perfect life plan: she would satisfy her father’s ambition by graduating as one of the first female doctors in Europe, and she would satisfy her mother’s ambition by marrying a very suitable fiancé in a grandiose society ceremony. Only weeks away from completing the former, Marie is mere days away from achieving the latter. But her whole life is thrown into chaos when her fiancé dies, mysteriously returns, and then is shot and killed, and Marie risks her own reputation to save the life of the man falsely accused of the murder.

Gordon, Lord Stanmore, finally tracks down the conman who stole from his estate, only to find himself embroiled in a murder plot. The woman he rescues offers to rescue him in return, by marrying him and providing an alibi. Gordon’s ready agreement to the scheme grows the more time he spends with his new wife. Her wit, her intelligence, her calm, her charm: Gordon finds himself more and more enchanted with this woman he met by mistake. But as the clues to the identity of the murderer start to align with the clues to the thief, they reveal a more elaborate scheme than he could have imagined, and though he might desire Marie, Gordon is unsure if he can trust her.

As their chase leads them out of Amsterdam and into the UK, both Gordon and Marie must adjust to the life that has been thrust upon them and decide if marriage came first, can love come after?

Happy Halloween, courtesy of Marie Antoinette’s Head

I came across this image of an impression of Marie Antoinette’s head, made by Madame Tussaud shortly after the queen’s execution. It’s eerie and a bit gruesome – perfect for Halloween.

During the height of the French Revolution, Madame Tussaud’s services were in high demand. Known for her unique talent for creating realistic wax figures, she was often commissioned to depict notable figures of the French Revolution. To accurately model the facial features of the person, she sometimes made a ‘death mask’ of the person to work from. She was often obliged to make wax figures of notable people who’d been executed by the guillotine, which is why she had to use death masks instead of modeling from life. Marie Antoinette wasn’t the only one to undergo the process of having a death mask taken; apparently Madame Tussaud also arrived on the scene of Marat’s murder, to make his death mask, so quickly that his assassin Charlotte Corday was still being processed by law enforcement.

Also gruesomely appropriate for Halloween

Since we’re on the subject of Madame Tussaud, I’d be remiss if I didn’t recommend you read the novel of the same name by Michelle Moran, if you haven’t already. It’s a tense and sweeping depiction of a fascinating woman and the turbulence of the French Revolution. And if you’re looking for a bit more on doomed queen Marie Antoinette and the escalation of the revolution, please don’t forget my own The Wardrobe Mistress!

Happy Halloween!

Physicality in Fiction

Recently, I read a thought-provoking and helpful article on Writer’s Digest on using physicality to bring your characters to life. There’s some great advice here. Incorporating different senses and the physical signs of emotion can help immerse the reader in the setting, even in the mind of the protagonist. Being grounded in the story world makes it feel that much more real – and exciting – as a reader.

 

I think this can be especially important in historical fiction. The genre brings its own unique challenge of trying to recreate a time long past, and sometimes, as a writer, it feels like grasping at echoes. Of course, one of the joys of historical fiction – both as a reader and writer – is that once the details and story click into place, you do slip into another world entirely. I love the way being drawn into a historical world feels like new, uncharted territory, but history has left just enough imprints on the present for it to feel a little bit familiar. You might know the bare bones of the time period, but not what happens to the protagonist, or maybe you find comforting kernels of ‘sameness’ in the characters. People haven’t changed so much, really. Three hundred years ago, they still wanted to find love, or worried about their children, or struggled under the weight of family pressures.

Trying to capture the sounds and textures and the smells of the story’s setting bring it to life. For me, while I’m writing, trying to show those things end up helping me connect more strongly to the world, help me to better polish it for the reader. It makes the setting more vivid, so a reader can easily imagine the acrid black smoke from the burning Réveillon wallpaper factory, or airy softness of one of Marie Antoinette’s muslin gowns, or picture the scum of half-congealed blood tarnishing the Tuileries after it was violently mobbed, to use examples from my novel The Wardrobe Mistress.

That last one was a little dark. Sensory depictions can be delightful, too, especially if they’re food related. I still think fondly of the way Crystal King’s description of kitchens and food in her Roman historical novel Feast of Sorrow made me clearly imagine I could smell the mouth-watering aromas of Parthian chicken or the tang of mustard beets. Sounds and music can pull readers into the world, too. I can still remember the rebellious thrum of music in the Prohibition ‘juice joints’ that Bonnie (of Clyde and Bonnie fame) frequented in Jenni Walsh’s novel Becoming Bonnie.

A story or character can also be deepened by plot, as the Writer’s Digest article that sparked this whole post suggests. The article mentions a Stephen King novel where the narrator is diagnosed with cancer. Another example I can think of that I particularly enjoyed is Julia Heaberlin’s novel Lie Still, where the protagonist is heavily pregnant throughout the story. It added an extra layer of tension. As danger escalated all around her, I feared not only for her, but for her soon-to-be-born child.

Habitual gestures or nervous tics can strengthen characterization, too. Outlander fans know that Jamie Fraser often taps his two stiff fingers (from being broken) against his thigh when thinking. In Kate Quinn’s The Alice Network, her character Eve struggles with a stammer, which sometimes intensifies during moments of high stress. While reading, it makes you ache with sympathy for her – especially because the high stakes WWI environment makes everything extra scary and intense.

What physical description or sensory element has really stood out to you in a book? Please share!

 

Historical Fiction Book Giveaway

My debut novel, The Wardrobe Mistress, has been out in the world for over a month now, and to celebrate I’ve got a fabulous book giveaway! Three winners will get a historical fiction prize pack with six books!

NEXT YEAR IN HAVANA by Chanel Cleeton (February 6th 2018) – In 1958, the daughter of a Cuban sugar baron embarks on a clandestine affair with a passionate revolutionary. In the present, her granddaughter returns to Cuba and discovers the lessons of her grandmother’s past to help her navigate her own romance, and find the true meaning of courage.

THE ORPHAN OF FLORENCE by Jeanne Kalogridis (October 3rd 2017) – A young woman rises from pickpocket to the assistant of “the Magician of Florence” and becomes tangled in a web espionage and murder

LAST CHRISTMAS IN PARIS by Heather Webb and Hazel Gaynor (October 3rd 2017) – Told through a series of heartfelt letters, a privileged young lady and a soldier share their experiences of the First World War, and maybe even find love amid its horrors.

THE LOST SEASON OF LOVE AND SNOW by Jennifer Laam (January 2nd 2018) – A beautiful and intellectual young woman attracts the attention of Russia’s most lauded poet and embarks upon a passionate and tempestuous relationship that leads to a tragic duel.

THE MOST BEAUTIFUL WOMAN IN FLORENCE by Alyssa Palombo (May 1st 2017) – Set in 15th Century Italy, a beautiful woman navigates complex relationships in Florentine society – and develops a passionate intimacy with Sandro Botticelli, leading to her immortalization in his masterpiece painting, The Birth of Venus.

THE WARDROBE MISTRESS by Meghan Masterson (Aug 15th 2017) – One of Marie Antoinette’s wardrobe women is torn between her loyalty to the queen and her love for an idealistic revolutionary as the danger of the French revolution escalates.

This could be you!

So how do you win? There are three ways to enter:

Facebook – Like and comment on the contest post. Extra entry if readers post a photo of one of the books with the hashtag #HistFicContest

Twittertweet using the hashtag #HistFicContest

Instagram – Tag a friend in the contest post, as well as using the hashtag #HistFicContest. Or, post a photo of any of the books in the prize pack, along with the hashtag #HistFicContest.

The winners will be announced on September 28th. Good luck!

 

Book Addiction: The Boat Runner

My latest book addiction is The Boat Runner by Devin Murphy, which publishes tomorrow. I got lucky enough to read this mesmerizing novel a bit early.

Captivating and powerful, The Boat Runner takes the reader to the perilous world of WWII, where young Jacob Koopman’s life wildly shifts from the prosperity of his family’s lightbulb business to the darkness of Nazi Germany as his father naively sends him to a Hitler Youth Camp and the outbreak of war shatters the peace. It’s a thought-provoking read that will have the readers feverishly turning pages and thinking about the story long after finishing the last page.

Devin kindly agreed to an interview on my blog. Welcome, Devin!

What was your inspiration for The Boat Runner?

One of the first sparks of this book came while reading a book about the Nazi navy written in 1945 by a German naval officer called, Defeat At Sea. Passages in the book referred to the sinking of ships only by their tonnage and supplies kept from being delivered to the Allies. The language was so cold toward the living people onboard that it haunted me. What mindset could be so void of empathy? That was the question I wanted to dig into, and led me down a long, fascinating road of research.

Did you get to visit any of the settings for your book? If not, where would you most want to go?

This novel travels across Europe but also takes place aboard ships at sea. As for Europe, my mother is from the Netherlands, and I have been there several times, but not during the writing of this book. Much of the land based scenes had to be drawn from memory, research, and talking to people who know about each place. The scenes based at sea were different. I spent 10 years travelling around the world working in the tourism industry. Along the way I realized that working aboard ships was the best option for me and I traveled to over fifty countries on all seven continents. I grew to know ships and the sea quite well – this pulses at the heart of my novel. Now, if I could go anywhere, I’d board a ship and sail the North Sea into the Ems Estuary which borders The Netherland and Germany. That fraught border that captured my imagination and led me into this novel.

Did you face any unexpected challenges or pleasant surprises while working on the novel?

I always liked history, but during the writing of this novel I really learned how to do research as a fiction writer. I stopped looking for just facts and details, but for scenes and events that I could hold up and ask, does this event reveal the complexity of what it was like to be alive at this moment for my character?  That is fun! I love finding something that leads me in a whole new direction and source of information to pour over.

What was your favourite scene to write?

There is a scene that one of my character’s inner conviction emerges from the shadows in such an epic, life-altering way that I get the chills every time it happens. I guess I’ll try not to spoil it, but watch out!

What’s your writing process like? Do you have a strict schedule or can you write anywhere, anytime?

I’m a professor so have to be pretty efficient about slotting my creative time or it tends to get swallowed up by other responsibilities. This means I try to write or edit at least four days a week and read every day. I do best when I am in a quiet place, but I have three small kids, a dog that loves to bark, and a cat that walks back and forth over my keyboard, so working outside of the house has become a necessity.

How can we stay updated on your book news?

Through Facebook, Twitter, and my author website.

From the book jacket:

In the tradition of All The Light We Cannot See and The Nightingale, comes an incandescent debut novel about a young Dutch man who comes of age during the perilousness of World War II.

Beginning in the summer of 1939, fourteen-year-old Jacob Koopman and his older brother, Edwin, enjoy lives of prosperity and quiet contentment. Many of the residents in their small Dutch town have some connection to the Koopman lightbulb factory, and the locals hold the family in high esteem.

On days when they aren’t playing with friends, Jacob and Edwin help their Uncle Martin on his fishing boat in the North Sea, where German ships have become a common sight. But conflict still seems unthinkable, even as the boys’ father naively sends his sons to a Hitler Youth Camp in an effort to secure German business for the factory.

When war breaks out, Jacob’s world is thrown into chaos. The Boat Runner follows Jacob over the course of four years, through the forests of France, the stormy beaches of England, and deep within the secret missions of the German Navy, where he is confronted with the moral dilemma that will change his life—and his life’s mission—forever.

Epic in scope and featuring a thrilling narrative with precise, elegant language, The Boat Runner tells the little-known story of the young Dutch boys who were thrown into the Nazi campaign, as well as the brave boatmen who risked everything to give Jewish refugees safe passage to land abroad. Through one boy’s harrowing tale of personal redemption, here is a novel about the power of people’s stories and voices to shine light through our darkest days, until only love prevails.

 

Author Biography:

Devin Murphy grew up near Buffalo, NY in a family with Dutch roots. He holds a BA/MA from St. Bonaventure University, an MFA from Colorado State University, a PhD from the University of Nebraska—Lincoln, and is an Assistant Professor of Creative Writing at Bradley University. He has worked various jobs in national parks around the country and once had a three-year stint at sea that led him to over fifty countries on all seven continents. His fiction has appeared in over 60 literary journals and anthologies, including The Missouri Review, Glimmer Train, The Chicago Tribune, New Stories from the Midwest, and Confrontation. He lives with his wife and children in Chicago.

 

Book Addiction: The Other Alcott

It’s been a while since I had a new Book Addiction post, but I’m really excited about this one. The Other Alcott by Elise Hooper captures the magic of Little Women, which I read probably a dozen times growing up.

Amy March, of Louisa May Alcott’s beloved classic Little Women, often gets the short straw compared to her feisty sister Jo, but in this novel, her real-life inspiration, Louisa’s sister May Alcott, gets a chance to shine. May’s determination to cast off the shadow of Amy March and to prove herself as an artist depicts her as a strong, likable heroine. Elise Hooper’s period details and elegant writing bring the story vividly to life, making this story one to be cherished alongside Alcott’s classic.

And now some insights from Elise on her wonderful book…

What was your inspiration for The Other Alcott?

I attended drama camp at Orchard House in Concord, MA, the former Alcott family home-turned-museum, when I was in elementary school and never could quite shake my interest in the Alcott sisters after that. I read all of Louisa’s books and wanted to know more about the sisters behind Little Women.

Did you face any unexpected challenges or pleasant surprises while working on the novel?

Once I delved into researching May’s art studies, both in Boston and Paris, I became fascinated with all of the other women who were trying to develop artistic careers. These women came from different backgrounds but all were drawn to the goal of becoming professional artists. That doesn’t seem so extraordinary in 2017, but it was pretty audacious for the late 1800s.

Which of the “Little Women” do you identify with most closely?

I always admired Jo’s single-minded drive to becoming a writer, but I think I have Amy’s optimistic spirit.

What was your favourite scene to write?

I loved writing the scenes with Jane Gardener. She seems like such a pistol! I’ve been told to write a novel about her next.

What’s your writing process like? Do you have a strict schedule or can you write anywhere, anytime?

I wish I had a strict schedule! Since I had two young daughters and teach part-time, I must be flexible. You can find me hunched over my laptop at my daughter’s gymnastics studio, at the pool while my girls swim, and in my minivan while I await my kids to get out of school.

How can we stay updated on your book news?

Someday I’m going to put out a newsletter. See? Now that I’ve said that here, I really will do it, so please sign up for it! In fact, I have some deleted chapters from the end of the book that I’d like to send out in a newsletter sometime this fall. In the meantime, Instagram is my social media outlet of choice.

You can also find Elise on Twitter. 

From the book jacket:

Elise Hooper’s debut novel conjures the fascinating, untold story of May Alcott—Louisa’s youngest sister and an artist in her own right.

We all know the story of the March sisters, heroines of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. But while everyone cheers on Jo March, based on Louisa herself, Amy March is often the least favorite sister. Now, it’s time to learn the truth about the real “Amy”, Louisa’s sister, May.

Stylish, outgoing, creative, May Alcott grows up longing to experience the wide world beyond Concord, Massachusetts. While her sister Louisa crafts stories, May herself is a talented and dedicated artist, taking lessons in Boston, turning down a marriage proposal from a well-off suitor, and facing scorn for entering what is very much a man’s profession.

Life for the Alcott family has never been easy, so when Louisa’s Little Women is published, its success eases the financial burdens they’d faced for so many years. Everyone agrees the novel is charming, but May is struck to the core by the portrayal of selfish, spoiled “Amy March.” Is this what her beloved sister really thinks of her?

So May embarks on a quest to discover her own true identity, as an artist and a woman. From Boston to Rome, London, and Paris, this brave, talented, and determined woman forges an amazing life of her own, making her so much more than merely “The Other Alcott.”

 

Author Biography: 

Although a New Englander by birth (and at heart), Elise now lives with her husband and two young daughters within stone-skipping distance of the Pacific Northwest’s Puget Sound. When she’s not writing, she’s in her classroom making American history and literature interesting for high school students. Want to try your hand at creating a pitch for Shark Tank: Colonial America Edition? Stop by her classroom.

The Other Alcott is Elise’s debut novel and will be released by William Morrow/Harper Collins in September 2017.